Tag Archives: Galatians 3.28

Increase (?) our faith (Ordinary Sunday 27, Year C)

Reading
Luke 17.5–10

The disciples say to Jesus,

Increase our faith!

The scriptures don’t mention their state of mind, but I can’t resist speculating. I suspect they were
anxious,
bewildered,
confused,
and shamed.

You see, Jesus had just said some things that showed that it’s very difficult sometimes to be his disciple. Things like this:

Things that cause people to trip and fall into sin must happen, but how terrible it is for the person through whom they happen. It would be better for them to be thrown into a lake with a large stone hung around their necks than to cause one of these little ones to trip and fall into sin.

What’s that about? What are the ‘things that cause people to trip and fall into sin’? Jesus explains what he means: it’s all about not forgiving other people. Surprised? Listen:

Watch yourselves! If your brother or sister sins, warn them to stop. If they change their hearts and lives, forgive them. Even if someone sins against you seven times in one day and returns to you seven times and says, ‘I am changing my ways,’ you must forgive that person.

That’s when the disciples say, ‘Increase our faith!’

The disciples are saying, You want us to forgive someone who keeps doing the wrong thing day after day after day? You’re asking the impossible! Increase our faith!

And what do they mean, ‘Increase our faith’? It is absolutely crucial to understand Jesus’ reply. He tells them the size of their faith doesn’t matter. It only needs to be the size of a mustard seed.

If size doesn’t matter, what does matter? Continue reading

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Who am I? Whose am I? (23 June 2013)

Readings
1 Kings 19.1–15a
Galatians 3.23–29
Luke 8.26–39

Dietrich Bonhoeffer was a Lutheran pastor and theologian who was hanged on Hitler’s direct orders only a few days before the end of World War 2. While a prisoner in a Nazi jail in 1943, he wrote a poem called Who am I?.

Bonhoeffer’s poem starts like this:

Who am I? They often tell me
I stepped from my cell’s confinement
calmly, cheerfully, firmly,
like a squire from his country house.

Who am I? They often tell me
I used to speak to my warders
freely and friendly and clearly,
as though it were mine to command.

Who am I? They also tell me
I bore the days of misfortune
equably, smilingly, proudly,
like one accustomed to win.

Bonhoeffer appeared to others to have it all together, even while he was a prisoner on ‘death row’. But inside, it was a different story. Continue reading

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